Done right, information governance captures the institutional memory of the people in an organization about the documents that have been used to record its activities over time. There are usually a few key people who know which business units have developed specific reports or forms for specific items, when the information in those reports or […]

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A company that is planning to acquire one or more companies in its own line of business can make pre-acquisition due diligence and post-acquisition document integration a seamless business process. In fact its M&A process can be a major competitive advantage, enabling it to make far more acquisitions in a given time with far lower […]

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M&A due diligence examination of the documents of the to-be-acquired company is critical – nobody wants to repeat HP’s $8.8 billion write-down following its acquisition of Autonomy. Faced with daunting volumes of data to review and accelerated time lines, acquiring companies often turn to technology tools used in e-discovery in an attempt to find the […]

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Faceted classification represents the collective judgment of knowledge workers or subject matter experts from multiple areas in an organization on how to classify documents and grant access to them. It is a logical outgrowth of visual classification and builds on the organization’s existing access authorization infrastructure. Faceted classification is an extremely efficient way to remove […]

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Sometimes profound implications become apparent from thinking through the implications of direct observations and sampling to determine the extent of the observed conditions. This is a story about the consequences of observing four Authorizations for Expenditures (“AFEs”) and a Daily Drilling Report (“DDR”) while in a meeting with an energy client talking about file share […]

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The Grossman-Cormack article, “Evaluation of Machine-Learning Protocols for Technology-Assisted Review in Electronic Discovery,” has kicked off some useful discussions. Here are our comments on two blog posts about the article, one by Ralph Losey, the other by John Tredennick and Mark Noel: Losey: The Text Streetlight Ralph Losey made an interesting point in his July 6, […]

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There has been ongoing debate in information governance and e-discovery circles on the significance of documents that do not contain searchable text, with evidence that half or more of the documents in some collections cannot be analyzed or managed because the tools used for those purposes require textual representations. How important is this limitation in […]

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The Emperor has No Clothes – and PC Can’t See Image-Only Documents There are several parallels between predictive coding (AKA technology assisted review) and Hans Christian Andersons’ tale, “The Emperor’s New Clothes.” In the story, two weavers tell the emperor they will make him a suit of clothes that will be invisible to those people […]

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Without the right tools, even basic information governance tasks can be difficult. The most glaring example is document classification which is the bedrock upon which virtually all information governance initiatives rest. If you can’t accurately classify an ever increasing volume of documents and correspondence, you can’t apply the correct retention schedules, you can’t specify which […]

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